Monthly Archives: March 2013

Another best advice – buying a guitar

The other day I wrote about a student from Berklee College of Music, who asked for my “best advice” – and I wrote about how you could optimize your practicing time. Here’s my best advice if you are thinking about buying a guitar or know someone who wants to start playing guitar, and therefore are about to invest in an instrument.

This is written either to advice beginners, or to inspire you if you are a serious guitar player with years experience, and therefore is someone your friends or students would ask for help in buying guitar related stuff 🙂

My best advice on buying a guitar

Don’t bother about the brand or model, don’t give it a lot of thought if its made of certain kind of wood, or has fancy features, looks extraordinary cool, has the latest invention of a tremolo system or anything like that. What’s important is that it should be easy to play and stay in tune!! Oh maybe one thing more – if you want to have an electric guitar – guess what: … buy an electric guitar.

My interest in guitars started from envy. I became SO jealous on my big brother who got an electric guitar when I was 4 years old. During the following years my interest for guitars grew because my brother started playing in bands. When he bought a “real” guitar – a Gretsch, I started to envy him again. Therefore I was allowed to use some of my child savings for a “real” guitar as well.

My brother found a second hand Hopf SG type electric guitar. He recommended that because it was easy to play and stayed in tune.

My brother Jesper help me, when I was buying a guitar for the very first time

Here’s my brother Jesper with his Gretsch Chet Atkins Tennessean and me with my Hopf SG

My best advice on buying a guitar

And I’ll pass that advice on to you: easy to play and stay in tune. Let me go a little in details on that 🙂

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I have always thought it was fun practicing - but it's paying off when I remember my best advice ... always pracitce something you can't play. Copyright @ Rishi

My best advice

The other day a student from Berklee College of Music asked me if I could give him an advice. Not just any advice – but my best advice to a young guitar player, who wanted to “live my life” and play the type of jobs I’ve done.

That was a tough one. There’s so many things I can think of depending on what you’re focusing at – I mean should it be concerning networking, education, playing gigs, recording sessions, getting the right guitar or practicing … well “practicing” – that’s a god place to start. So here it is … at least one of them 🙂

Practicing

Everyone who is thinking of being a professionel (musician) knows that you have to practice/study (hard). Personally I was told this the very first time by my brother when I was around ten years old. From that day I started to practice a bit more seriously. Later on I practiced many hours every day.

Sometimes Soren Reiff has  been practicing picking technic for hours. In this post you'll get my best advice. Copyright @ Rishi

Often I’ve been practicing picking technic for hours. Copyright @ Rishi

Did it pay off? Yes … my playing improved – and that motivated me to practice even harder.

Did that pay off? Continue reading

Soren Reiff performing with his brother Jesper Reiff

Music as a profession – my history

Some time ago I wrote a post about how I didn’t choose to have music as a profession – I just couldn’t imaging a life without playing guitar every day … all day – so today we are looking down the history lane.

My first guitar

I started playing guitar when I was around 4 years old. My big brother bought an electric guitar and I got so jealous that my parents bought me a small acoustic as well. I guess they thought I would keep interest for a week or two and then return to my normal routines, but no …

My brother, who was ten years older than me, showed me new chords or a scale every once in a while, but I didn’t had “real” lessons on a regular basics. I had fun with the guitar, but I also did a lot of other typical child stuff.

When I was around ten years old my brother took me to an Eric Clapton concert and I was blown away. When we left the concert hall, I told my brother that I would play like Clapton one day. He smiled and told me that if I wanted to do that, I should practice and practice a lot. l remember how I said to myself: “hell yeah, then I’m going to practice a lot”, but I just looked at my bro and said “ok”.

Jesper Reiff playing livewith Soren Reiff (10 years old) @ Smogen, Holbæk - with no thoughts of having music as a profession

Jesper Reiff playing live with Soren Reiff (10 years old) @ Smogen, Holbæk – playing for the fun of it – with no thoughts of having music as a profession

After that experience my interest for music intensified. I bought my first electric guitar when I was ten years old and started practicing a bit more seriously. Continue reading

The tc electronic Flashback delay in Soren Reiff's pedalboard

TC Electronic Flashback delay

I’ve been using TC Electronics products for more than 25 years I guess. The first TC Electronic pedal I bought was the phaser, and after that I’ve had several of their products. For years especially the 2290 has been an important part of my setup, so when I heard about the TC Electronic Flashback delay, I thought it would be a natural part of my board.

Facts about the TC Electronic Flashback delay

The TC Electronic Flashback delay offers you 11 different delay types. In addition to the “normal” different delay types, you get the TonePrint function. TonePrint gives you your favorite guitar players custom presets, in one of the delay modes. This is downloaded to the pedal either by your computer and an usb-cable or by and app for your smartphone. All in all a lot of possibilities in a regular stomp box – super.

The loop function is cool and sounds great – and I have loop time enough for my need (40 seconds).

The tc electronic Flashback delay in Soren Reiff's pedalboard

The TC Electronic Flashback delay in my pedalboard

Does it cover all my needs delay wise?

Overall the pedal sounds great. The different presets sound cool, and it covers about everything you can expect from a delay pedal, at least from a small stomp box.

Continue reading